Category Archives: Warhammer Fantasy

Bretonnian Questing Knights

As promised here are my completed Questing Knight units. As I have said in an earlier post, these guys are really nice models. As with all my Bretonnian Knights I have gone with strong plain primary colours for their heraldry.

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Ranked up in the Bretonnian Lance formation. I am still not convinced it looks like a lance head but does make easier construction of movement trays. Talking of which – mine have a 5mm separator between ranks to keep horses from knocking noses with tails.

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This knight is the 5th Edition Baron Odo d’Outremer.  Used as is without any modifications other than a 6th Ed charger.

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This is the one plastic knight I used in the two nine-man lances. He was modified only by the addition of a great sword arm from a 5th Ed Bretonnian Hero (that figure was wielding the sword two handed so I cut the hilt off after the right hand and drilled a bit of wire in to make an extended hilt).

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This is a Questing Knight wielding a two handed axe.

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Rear view of same. I made all the guff for his saddle from spares and bits. I have no idea where the spare lute came from.

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This knight is the 5th Edition Sir Tristan model. Questing Knights don’t carry lances so I made him into another banner bearer. Added a beard as well.  All that traveling – no time to shave.

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This Questing Knight miniature is one of the ones that came in single blister packs. Do you remember those days? I think he is Sir Brian the Blessed.  His gear includes a ham and a helmet full of potatoes.

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A rear view of another knight with a saddle load of gear cobbled together from bits.

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Yet one more. One thing I can say for the Bretonnian knight and peasant sprues, they sure had a lot of extras on them,

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Knights in full charge.

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In this shot you can see the 5th Edition Repanse de Lyonesse. Her lance converted to a standard with a reliquary on top. I gave her more hair and made her a Ginger as well.

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Bretonnian Archers – Horde Style

I wanted to do a couple of large units of Bretonnian archers for my Warhammer Fantasy army. Each of these units is forty figures strong. They are made up of 5th and 6th edition Games Workshop plastics ans some of the old 5th Edition ‘Squires’ figures as well as Front Rank Hundred Years War English longbowmen. I think that all the models work really well together and I have mixed them on bases all over the shop.  I based the front twenty models four to a 40x40mm base.  I probably should have done another rank on strip bases and left the back rank alone on individual bases.  The movement trays incorporate the stakes and chains that come with the current edition archer sets.  This is a non-legal GW army for one of their stores or sponsored tournaments given all the heretical figures I have used – but then again, who cares?

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Bretonnian Questing Knights: WIP

I have been mucking around painting these guys on and off for the last ten years – since the 6th Edition Bretonnian release back in 2004. Kind of fun to do, but I am not sure what I will ever do with them.  These are some Bretonnian Questing Knights I am working on in between painting Napoleonics.  They are pretty much completed now and when I get back home I will post new pictures.

The Questing Knight models are the best of the Games Workshop sculpts for the Bretonnian range in my opinion. The idea of a knight riding to battle with a bureau on his warhorse tickles my fancy.  They are laden down with all sorts of baggage. Stupid, but kind of cool. For this lot I have made my own ‘baggage” for the most part. The sharp eyed will also notice an older 5th Edition model or two in there as well.

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Here are a few of the first lot of Questing Knights I finished some years ago now.

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And the Battle Standard Bearer for this army. A Grail Knight Hero.

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Bretonnian Henge

This terrain piece was another joint effort between one of my children and I for a school project. At the time my daughter was about eight and was doing a module on Stonehenge.  She wanted me to help her make a model that she could show off at school. They had just visited New Zealand’s own Stonehenge to see a replica henge and she was all inspired.  I think the chances of her and I cooperating on any projects like this now are pretty slim so this model is rather special to me.

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Once again we used insulation foam and a base of MDF.  Now we could have made an exact replica of the real Stonehenge, but I persuaded her that a representative ruined henge would be just as good – and I got a decent piece of table top terrain for Warhammer Fantasy battles.

The stone effect on the blocks was produced by the simple expedient of putting the foam onto the concrete path and standing on it.  Seemed to work. Of course, my daughter had to add her very own touch and while her brother was watching TV she sneaked up and snipped off a lock of his hair and used to to make some of the grass tufts we used. Needless to say, he was not happy.

Knights and a Bretonnian Damsel riding through the henge.

ImageThis Bretonnian henge has two large trilithons – visible in this shot.

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Bretonnian Knights Errant riding through the shrine to the Old Gods.

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A large fallen column lies broken.

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Another shot of same.

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An overhead shot showing the alter stone in the centre of the henge. Tracks wend their way amongst the ruins of the monument.

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The Damsel can draw power from the ancient magic of the stones. Well that is the theory. I haven’t played Warhammer for a while.Image

As a final note – the current state of the Bretonnian Henge is not good. It has fallen into even more ruin. A pesky possum got into the Woolshed and knocked it off the shelf it was stored on and it was somewhat damaged. Well, it was flattened really. All the bits are there so I will repair it. As to the fate of the possum…well possum fur goes for NZ$140 per kilogram at the moment.

Bretonnian Castle

Years ago when my boy was at primary school they were doing a module on castles. They had to build a castle, so we worked on this project together. The wobbly lines of masonry I blame on my ten year old son.  Pictures of this castle have previously appeared on the Round Table of Bretonnia forum.

We used the castle in the Bretonnian army book for inspiration and as a template – including the damaged wall, that should have seen the keep collapse. No apologies for stealing their ideas.  The castle was made from high density insulation foam, card, pollyfilla and bark. It is mounted on a piece of mdf board.

This picture shows pretty much the entire front of the castle, including a dry moat and drawbridge.

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The Gate Tower.

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A close-up of a knight at the Gate Tower.

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A close-up of the damaged keep.

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A shot along the rear wall.

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An overhead shot of the interior of the castle.

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Here we have a Bretonnian friar at the main entrance to the Keep.

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Here are some archers defending the keep.

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Overhead shot of the Gate Tower.

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The Lady of the Castle rides forth.

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Bretonnian Knights – by Front Rank Miniatures.

I have been building a Bretonnian Warhammer army for years and years. I have done very little gaming with this army, but it probably gives me more painting pleasure than anything else I have ever done.  I went for simple strong primary colours on the knights, and lots of drab colours on the peasantry.  I am also a notorious cheapskate when it comes to wargaming and can happily say that almost all the models in this army came from second hand stalls and internet auctions – given Games Workshop’s pricing regime for Australia and New Zealand, with a few exceptions (paints being a good example), they can take a hike.

This unit was made from converted Front Rank 100 Years Wars Knights.  The conversion was pretty basic. I took off the hands and lances and pinned and glued on Games Workshop 6th Ed Bretonnian Knight hands/arms.  I did this to keep a uniform look with the other knight’s in my army who are standard GW Bretonnian miniatures. The legs were not quite sized right to straddle one of the monstrously huge GW Bretonnian Chargers, so a bit of bending with pliers sorted that one out.  Added a few GW Bretonnian shields and symbols and Bob’s your Uncle. There is a GW knight in the unit for comparison (front left in the next photo)

ImageI am not sure where this figure came from. I thought he was a Front Rank but I am not so sure now. One of those acquisitions that you find in a box and have no fecking idea where it came from.

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The finished unit of nine knights. The heraldic decals are from a variety of sources. Old 5th Ed GW, 6th Ed GW, Space marine decals and some by a chap in the States who no longer makes them.

ImageThe command unit of this Lance of Knights.I really enjoyed doing the heraldry on these guys. The trumpeter came out pretty well I thought.

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The three tear drops on the knight at the back came from a Space Marines decal sheet. I use movement trays for all units in this army. Balsa, sand and flock.

ImageThis is about half my Bretonnian Army. Not shown are the Pegasus Knights and hordes more peasants (two units of 50 halberders and one more or 40 archers).  I also have another fifty or so knights to paint.

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Bretonnian Men at Arms

I am not what you would call a great player or fan of Warhammer, but I do like some of the models. The Bretonnian Army was the least fantasy-ish and I really liked a lot of the models for this range. However, being a wargamer, and not a Games Workshop Hobbyist, I am not too fussed at where my miniatures for this army come from. I always balked at the prices that are charged for these miniatures here in New Zealand so almost all of the GW models I used have come from internet trades, mostly at a fraction of their ‘shelf price’.

The first photo is of the first unit of Men at Arms I have completed. I have another two of these. Don’t ask me why – it is just when I see twenty or thirty models on sale for $10 or so, I have to buy them.

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I figure that my knights will each bring one or two men at arms with them to battle so I have a big range of liveries on their gigantic shields.

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I had a whole bunch of Front Rank 100YW or War of the Roses figures so chucked them in as well. Hacked arms off, added shield, the odd head swap and gave them some humongous Games Workshop halberds.

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Another view of the same three figures.

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Finally a shot of some mounted Men at Arms. These are really nice little models. I picked up these ten figures for about NZ$20. A bargain considering that the same ten figures new would have set me back NZ$200.

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28mm Conflix-style Medieval Houses

I am away from the Woolshed for nine days – down in Wellington for work. I have delved into the past to find an article I wrote that first appeared on the Kapiti Fusiliers website (now sadly defunct).  Anyways, without further ado…

Some time ago I brought a couple of pre-painted Conflix 25mm buildings. They are a little fantasy-ish for many people’s liking but I found them to be exactly what I wanted for my Bretonnian village. I wanted an entire village but thought the cost may have been a little prohibitive so decided that I could make something similar. Here are the results.

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I used high density insulation polystyrene for the body of the building. Six months ago I got a 2.4m x 0.6m sheet for NZ$30. Styrofoam is manufactured by Dow Chemicals (in Saudi Arabia) and is available just about everywhere. So far the sheet I brought has built a model Stonehenge, a 28mm Fantasy castle and now two houses and I still have three quarters of it left. For the roof and shingles I made do with card from old note books. Wood was balsa scraps (I never throw anything away and keep all those little pieces left over from basing my figures). For glue I used PVA and Selleys No-More-Nails. The only paint I brought especially for this project was a small test pot of a terracotta colour from the local hardware store for NZ$4.00.

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First thing I did was do a few sketches to get an idea of what I wanted to build. In this case I used the Conflix building as a guide for overall size and the angle of the gable. Then I cut the polystyrene into the basic house shape I had decided upon and glued together with No-More-Nails. I do not have a hot wire foam cutter so use a box cutter knife to fashion the styrene instead. You just have to be careful that you don’t pull the blade through the foam or it will pull and not cut cleanly. I used toothpicks to pin the pieces together and to provide support while the glue dried. I cut roof sections from card and glued them to the gable ends.

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Then I cut balsa into strips and glued it around the body of the house to form all exterior beams, door and window frames. Door handles were made by using small panel pins pushed into the styrene leaving the head exposed.

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Now the really boring bit. Cut 5mm strips from thin card – I used the backing off old note pads. Then snip them to make 5mm x 8mm tiles. You don’t have to be that accurate, just make sure that they are all about the same size. Starting at the bottom of the roof, glue a line of tiles down. Continue doing this up the roof until you reach the ridge. Do the same on the other side of the gable and you just need to glue some capping pieces along the ridge.

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I had tried to find some wire mesh of about the right size to use as lead light window panes but could not find anything around the house or for a reasonable price at the hardware store. So instead, I glued card into the window openings with the intention of just painting the lead lights later. At this stage the construction phase of the project was finished.

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Now it was time to add a bit of texturing. All I did was smear some Selley’s No-More-Gaps on the wall with my finger. Any excess that got on the timber beams can be trimmed off later before painting. For the chimney, I cut a small rectangular piece of foam about the size I wanted. Then I cut a notch for it to fit onto the roof and glued it in place with No-More-Nails. When it was dried I shaped i with craft knife and then etched the stone shapes in with a pencil.

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Now the building is finished it is time to paint. Although it is tempting to spray paint the model, unless you have an airbrush I would not recommend it as a way of applying the first coat. The solvents in the spray paint do a fine job of dissolving polystyrene. So, the best thing is to apply a coat of paint over all the exposed styrene first with a brush. After that you can happily spray coat the rest of the building. I used a can of black automotive spray undercoat.

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I wanted my building to look like the Conflix ones that I already had, so I painted and dry-brushed the walls grey, the timber beams using GW Vermin Brown and the tiles with a terracotta house paint to match. The results do not look too shabby.

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The finished product (right) standing alongside its Conflix counterparts.